Preppers are “Ready for Anything”.  We don’t prepare for just one thing as some TV shows would have you believe. The Prepper philosophy dictates that you prepare for anything that might come your way.  As such, one of your first steps is an assessment of your situation.  What kind of things happen in your region?  If you live in Louisiana, you have a high chance of having (another) hurricane hit you.  If you’re in Maine, you have a very high chance of winter ice storms that knock power out.  If you live in California, you have a high chance of an earthquake.  This site can show you a lot about regional hazards while this site will show you charts of where it’s “safer” to live.
They have a huge selection of dehydrated and freeze-dried foods from top brands such as Saratoga Farms, Mountain House, EasyPrep, OvaEasy, Yoders, Datrex, Mainstay, WonderMill, and more. They also have a complete selection of MRE Military Meals. These include self-heating kits with meals like spaghetti, sweet and sour chicken, and garden vegetables in tomato sauce.

Use mylar bags when storing bulk items.  After about four years the pinto beans started growing mold.  It was hard to get the stink out of the bucket even after using bleach.  I didn’t have a mold problem with my black beans or other food just the pinto beans.  I trashed them and bought more storing them in the same bucket.  After two years they became moldy again.  I now use one-gallon mylar bags to help:
Places on the internet like http://www.doomsdayprepperforums.com are as busy as ever, and contrary to my own initial assumptions, much cooler heads seem to prevail on most online prepping communities. Members work to be helpful to one another and offer a wealth of good advice. Though the common refrain among preppers is that once SHTF (prepper shorthand for when the Shit Hits The Fan) the general mood will be every man for himself, doomsday preppers and survivalists believe that well-meaning people who want to protect themselves, their property and their families deserve some level of support, and they strive to provide that to each other.
Doug owns a rock hauling business in Tennessee and plans to bug-in with his family in his underground bunker. Doug, whose line of work has earned him the nickname "Rockman", also plans to use a hillside full of boulders as a defense to ward off potential threats. He is also stockpiling coins minted before the 1970s because of their higher silver content, which makes them useful for bartering. Jeff Flaningham is a single, Wisconsin native, who is looking for woman who will live with him in his decommissioned SM-65 Atlas missile silo located in rural central Kansas in the event of a catastrophic event. During the program, Jeff goes on dates with three women he has met through an online dating service. He then arranges a second date with one of them, Stephanie, to go visit his missile silo.
If a silo in Kansas is not remote or private enough, there is another option. In the first seven days after Donald Trump’s election, 13,401 Americans registered with New Zealand’s immigration authorities, the first official step toward seeking residency—more than seventeen times the usual rate. The New Zealand Herald reported the surge beneath the headline “Trump Apocalypse.”
Finelli’s not from around here; an adopted Midwestern politeness hardly masks direct, fast-thinking, faster-talking East Coast roots, although he won’t tell me where he’s from exactly. He’s guarded like that. He won’t say where he went to college, only that he graduated from a prestigious undergraduate program and then got an MBA; nor will he say where he worked after, only that he started a company on the West Coast to manufacture satellite communications receivers before a Japanese competitor threatened to kill him. He will say he knows the moon landing was faked. In 1982, he moved back east from California and began designing computer systems for a Fortune 100 credit card company.
Volume 60, 2018 Vol 59, 2017 Vol 58, 2016 Vol 57, 2015 Vol 56, 2014 Vol 55, 2013 Vol 54, 2012 Vol 53, 2011 Vol 52, 2010 Vol 51, 2009 Vol 50, 2008 Vol 49, 2007 Vol 48, 2006 Vol 47, 2005 Vol 46, 2004 Vol 45, 2003 Vol 44, 2002 Vol 43, 2001 Vol 42, 2000 Vol 41, 1999 Vol 40, 1998 Vol 39, 1997 Vol 38, 1996 Vol 37, 1995 Vol 36, 1994 Vol 35, 1993 Vol 34, 1992 Vol 33, 1991 Vol 32, 1990 Vol 31, 1989 Vol 30, 1988 Vol 29, 1987 Vol 28, 1986 Vol 27, 1985 Vol 26, 1984 Vol 25, 1983 Vol 24, 1982 Vol 23, 1981 Vol 22, 1980 Vol 21, 1979 Vol 20, 1978 Vol 19, 1977 Vol 18, 1976 Vol 17, 1975 Vol 16, 1974 Vol 15, 1973 Vol 14, 1972 Vol 13, 1971 Vol 12, 1970 Vol 11, 1969 Vol 10, 1968 Vol 9, 1967 Vol 8, 1966 Vol 7, 1965 Vol 6, 1964 Vol 5, 1963 Vol 4, 1962 Vol 3, 1961 Vol 2, 1960 Vol 1, 1959
In some parts of the world, mosquitoes, flies, and other biting insects are major vectors for extremely serious diseases, such as malaria, African sleeping sickness, dengue fever, or lymphatic filariasis. The same is not a grave concern in more temperate climates; although malaria used to be a problem in some of the southern states, it has been eradicated by 1951. Today, some of the most serious incidents in the US and in Europe are the occassional cases of Lyme borreliosis or the West Nile virus.
I'm not quite crazy enough to say that epinephrine will help you survive the inevitable zombie apocalypse (you can go here for that). I'm just suggesting in a roundabout way that if you happened to be in a situation where something was trying to eat you, the increased heart rate and blood flow to your muscles brought on by a well-timed dose might just save your life.
Testers felt Soylent beat Tsogo on flavor. However, the Tsogo line has a lot of products, such as fruit and vegetable powders and boost packs (protein, caffeine, energy, green tea), so it’s worth checking out. This might be a line of products you want to work into your regular life, so cycling through your supply before it expires would make the shelf-life less of a concern.
Part of prepping is not just stocking up on items, but also acquiring certain skills and training that will prove useful. Below is a list of many different skills you can learn. While you can’t be a master of all trades, it may be beneficial to focus on 2-3 skills you can become an expertise at. Then you will become the go to guy time and time again 🙂
Groceries. Try to shop at less expensive grocery stores and try out lower-shelf brands - especially when it comes to commodities such as cooking oil, paper towels, milk, seltzer water, flour, sugar, or salt. Table salt tastes and works the same, whether you paid $1 at Walmart or $15 for a Sherpa-approved Himalayan variety at Whole Foods. Groceries eat up a good chunk of our monthly budgets, so even seemingly inconsequential savings tend to add up very fast.
At seventy-seven, living on a tugboat in Sausalito, Brand is less impressed by signs of fragility than by examples of resilience. In the past decade, the world survived, without violence, the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression; Ebola, without cataclysm; and, in Japan, a tsunami and nuclear meltdown, after which the country has persevered. He sees risks in escapism. As Americans withdraw into smaller circles of experience, we jeopardize the “larger circle of empathy,” he said, the search for solutions to shared problems. “The easy question is, How do I protect me and mine? The more interesting question is, What if civilization actually manages continuity as well as it has managed it for the past few centuries? What do we do if it just keeps on chugging?”
This is in response to the person who suggested reading The Hot Zone. Alec or Alex. I have read it and now I’m suddenly seeing the information go mainstream. The 4 levels of biocontainment are mentioned on TV, such as in the show Blindspot. Even the phrase Hot Zone is used on TV. And the various hemorrhagic fevers are mentioned. None of it is explained which makes me feel like I’m in the cool group who read the book and knows the terms. Yes, fellow readers, this IS my idea of fun.

Mountain House, Wise Food, My Patriot Supply, and Ready Store need to get better in this regard. In some cases, we had to call a company and dig deeper than reasonable in order to find out calorie content — or we had to look at individual nutritional labels to reverse engineer the math. In other cases they called something a “1-month bucket” but that was based on silly calorie numbers.


The aforementioned short list aside, there are other substances that may treat conditions such as anaphylaxis (epinephrine), or diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy (isoniazid), uncomplicated appendicitis (levofloxacin), cholera and anthrax (doxycycline), malaria (artemisinin), typhoid fever, skin infections, and MRSA (TMP/SMX), systemic fungal infections (fluconazole), intestinal parasites (albendazole), and so on. In many places, you could legitimately stockpile them without prescription, and some prepper guides will encourage you to do so; but if you are truly concerned about such emergencies, be very aware of the difficulty of properly diagnosing unfamiliar diseases, and the serious health problems that many of these products may cause.
When doing a mixed container, I put the Ziploc bag with various condiments from Taco Bell and other places, salt, pepper, hot sauce soup mixes and lots of things which can be put in the cracks and crevices in there. Also, put in the Ziploc with matches( in a small spice bottle) a couple of boxcutters and a manual can opener. Sam’s had tomato sauce, crushed tomatoes, etc. for three dollars and change per #10 can.
Beyond this, stick to your favorite foods and don't feel pressured to skip regular meals - but cut all portions in half, even if it means throwing a half-eaten burger out. Don't go back for seconds, too. It will feel wrong the first couple of times, but it's surprisingly easy to do. That's because portion control is almost completely psychological; your blood hormone and nutrient levels go up only some time after you cleaned your plate. Eating more slowly can make this step a lot easier, too.
Food storage should be an integral part of any prepper’s contingency plans. The best prepper food storage containers should not be overlooked if you want your food stores to last. Storing your food in the right containers can give you peace of mind when it comes to your family’s sustenance. If you are starting from scratch, start small and work your way up. I personally prefer to rotate out my pantry using the first in, first out (FIFO) inventory technique. This ensures that I don’t have much food expire (if any) and gives me good visibility of what I actually have stored. Whether you stash your food for 15 years, or rotate your supply every 6 months- the right prepper food storage containers can give you a leg up with your shelf life. Keep exploring, stay prepared, and be safe.

Check dried goods: rice, flour, grains – frequently for bug infestation. You can mix food grade diatomaceous earth in with dried goods and it will kill pantry moths and weevils. It is safe for humans and pets (as long as it is food grade). It works by shredding the exoskeletons of any soft bodied bug. It is used in grain silos to keep bugs from infesting grain. You can probably get some through a feed store. Some garden centers carry it. You can also order it online, but check the shipping cost. Pantry moth larva and weevils can squeeze through some very tight fitting lids. We’ve been fooled often by them.
Tim Ralston — A survival tool manufacturer (the Crovel), loses part of a thumb during firearms practice for the show; Jason Charles, a New York City fireman-turned-prepper, demonstrates urban survival skills; Jules Dervaes is preparing for the collapse of the industrial food system; Pat Brabble insists on surviving hyperinflation by planning ahead.
Don't hit the gym. Hold off with intense workouts at least until you are close to your target weight. Daily exercise schedules are hard to keep for more than a couple weeks, especially if you lead a busy life; on top of that, a drastic increase in physical activity can trigger cravings or upend your nutritional needs. If you are itching to burn some extra fat, incorporate less punishing activities into your daily routine - say, walking or leisurely biking to work.
The most popular category are semi-automatic rifles, including the scary-looking AR-15 clones, the much less villainous Ruger Mini-14, and a bunch of in-between choices, such as Ares SCR. All three are known for reliability and good accuracy. Semi-automatics typically fire relatively small but high-energy projectiles (e.g., .223 Remington / 5.56x45mm NATO); such projectiles are still suitable for home defense and hunting small to medium game.
The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that the average homeowner should store at least three to five days of water and three days of food in case of an emergency or natural disaster. However, assembling an emergency kit, especially if you’re not entirely clear on what to purchase, can be a challenge. Wise Food Storage, thankfully, offers a line of emergency kits for the home and the car that are perfect for surviving emergency situations. Wise Food Storage specializes in preparing long-term, ready-made emergency meals and snacks. From freeze dried meats to dehydrated vegetables, Wise Food Storage carries a number of easy-to-prepare food items that prepared to last for years. Many of the food items are stored in specially designed pouches and extra-durable buckets that effectively seal out moisture and heat—in fact, when stored correctly in a dark, cool environment, Wise Food Storage meals and snacks can last for decades. Wise Food Storage offers a number of different emergency kits to meet a variety of different needs, including a five-day, one-person emergency kit as well as a survival kit that can meet the needs of six people for five days. The five-day kit for a family of six features nearly everything a person could need to survive during an emergency event, including 32 gourmet, ready-made, long-term entrees, water, a stove, cups, flashlights, first aid kits, blankets, matches, playing cards, and five extra-rugged backpacks. Wise Food Storage also offers emergency kits for particular needs or situations, as well. For example, the hunting survival kit features everything an outdoors enthusiast may need to survive in the woods, including an emergency sleeping bag, waterproof matches, an emergency candle, rope, a shovel, a first aid kits and a 4-in-1 flashlight. Wise Food Storage also carries a car emergency kit, which features jumper cables, robe, a first aid kit, duct tape, a survival whistle and a emergency blanket. By storing a few basic supplies in your home or car, you can ensure that you and your loved ones will remain safe and healthy in the event of a natural disaster or unforeseen situation.
×